Monday, November 3, 2008

WoGE #154

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After a long time I have scored another win on the Where on Google Earth challenge and solved WoGE #153 (Jan Mayen volcanic island) hosted by volcanista on her Magmalicious Blog.

I will invoke the Schott Rule here because I want people who have not yet won a WoGE to get a chance. This means all those who have already won must wait one hour for each of their wins.

If you can identify the location of WoGE #154 please reply in the comments stating the exact location or coordinates and also some information about the geologic significance of this location. Simple stating the location without geology I will let not let count! If you are correct you get to host and select WoGE #155. If you do not have a blog you may designate someone to host it for you.

Here it is:



Good luck!

Posting time was 11:54PM CET (Central European Time) - that is UTC+1

7 comments :

Peter L said...

36.15N - 8.65E
This is the Jebel Debadib massif in the diapiric zone of the northern Tunisian Atlas. The axial zone of the massif consists of a NE-SW elongated Triassic evaporitic (halite and gypsum) diapire, which extruded through Jurassic and younger sediments during Cenozoic compressional events. The picture represents the southeastern flank of the massif, where Paleocene and Eocene strata overlie mostly carbonatic late-Cretaceous deposits. The NW-SE road in the middle of picture runs along a fault that displaces the contact between these units. I guess, the bunch of tiny square spots connected by branching roads in the east and southeast are oil wells exploiting hydrocarbon traps linked to the Jebel Debadib diapir.

Lost Geologist said...

I have to admit I am a bit uncertain on how to procede. Even though the given location and geologic description is correct (except for the oil, I think it's just tiny huts) you missed the most important point of geological information to this location. I think I should let you have this win but I still want to hear why this location is so..."famous".

Peter L said...

OK, I tried to dig up something more "famous" about this very place. Are you thinking of the planctonic foram faunal turnover at the El Kef K/T boundary within the El Haria formation, which triggered considerable debate on whether it does or does not represent evidence for meteor/comet impact-related mass extinction? A "blind sampling site" trying to solve the problem is located somewhere here, in the western part of the picture... There are some related geochem studies here evidencing sharp CaCO3 level changes, anomalous Ni-rich spinel concentrations on the K/T boundary...

Peter L said...

ps. Actually there are several blind sampling sites across the whole pic, not only in the western part as I claimed.

Lost Geologist said...

Well it's close enough.

The foto and coordinates are the official GSSP at the boundary clay of the K/T boundary.

Lost Geologist said...

You may post the link to the next WOGE Peter. :)

Peter L said...

WoGE #155 is posted. Enjoy!