Monday, January 28, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth # 104

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BGC found the WoGE #103 and could now propose the next one. He has no blog or website of his own so I was asked to host the image for him. It's BGC's call when this WoGE is solved. Of course I won't partake. I know the location.

For all those new to WoGE simply post a reply to this post stating the detailed description of the location or the lat-lon coordinates. Most of us will also say something about the geology/geography of the site, too. The Schott Rule applies (previous winners must wait one hour for every win they had).

Post time was 7:15PM GMT+1

Saturday, January 26, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth # 103

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Solving Peter L's WoGE # 102 it is my turn again to post. I picked what I think is interesting and I would like to also hear something (only a line or two are ok) about the geology and why the site I picked it so interesting.

For all those new to WoGE simply post a reply to this post stating the detailed description of the location or the lat-lon coordinates. Most of us will also say something about the geology/geography of the site, too. The Schott Rule applies (previous winners must wait one hour for every win they had).

Posting time was 5:50 PM GMT+1

Friday, January 25, 2008

3 more geoblogs

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I added Active Margin, Harmonic Tremors and The Accretionary Wedge to my Blogroll.

Thursday, January 24, 2008

Time and Life

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My Geoblog-Experiment continues (for now), however, I decided to cut back on my blogging activity. Life and university demand a lot in the last semester especially now that I need to re-orientate myself and find a new thesis project (see previous post). Meaning I will only blog about actually geology I do myself (which isn't that much unfortunately) and of course post the Where on (Google) Earth when I do score a win. I'll keep looking around and reading in the Geoblogosphere though.

Monday, January 21, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth #99

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Back on ClasticDetritus I solved WoGE #98 and found the Falkland Islands. The last two WoGE locations I have chosen were pretty easy I found out. Maybe this one is tougher. I removed the image attribution information.

For any new players to Where on (Google)Earth, simply put the lat-long or detailed description of the location in the comments below. It would be great if you also say something about the geography or geology and sometimes we share our tactics for searching. If you win, you get to host the next one. The Schott Rule (previous winners must wait for 1 hour for every win) is in effect.
Post time was 07:10 PM Central European Time. CET is GMT+1.

Friday, January 18, 2008

Another new Geoblog I found

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Although primarily a blog about ocean sciences that is very interesting to read one can also find some infrequent but highly interesting posts relating to geology (i.e. hydrothermal vents). For me it is fast becoming one of my favorites to read. That's why I added Deep-Sea News to my list of Geoblogs!

Bad news always comes fridays

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Actually - it doesn't but tonight it feels like it. I had a very long planed idea about where to do my Diploma thesis. Today I received an email from my contact in the company stating that he is very sorry to inform me that he will no longer be able to support me because he left the company. This effectively means I need to completely re-orientate myself less than half a year before I must begin my Diploma thesis (similiar to Master). We've been talking about this for almost a year and it is such a very disappointing news to read that it has all been for nothing. To me it seems extremely unlikely that I can do my thesis about mineral deposits and exploration within this company without having his support. I really feel like a "The Lost Geologist" now - very lost and left alone. This seemed like written in stone for me and I didn't even think about looking for other opportunities. Now I am back to zero. Byebye Nevada, byebye Peru...

It seems like I have to do some serious meditating about this issue during the next few days to revise my options. I do not feel like doing one of the standard thesis topics students usually get directly from university around here especially because there are non that have any connection with mineral deposits and exploration.

Thursday, January 17, 2008

Six thin sections, a day of work and a lot of patience...

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That's what it took to make the fotos for my seminar paper I am working on and that's also what it took to make me wonder if I am halucinating or indeed seeing something that is not just plain dirt again and at the end, that's what it will take to perhaps prove something previously unknown - or perhaps it will all have been a lot of wasted time of driving, taking samples in the snow, cutting them, grinding them, glueing them and bothering half the faculty to please, please give me a decent microscope.

Today I was fortunate enough to have some time with the best microscope I could get my hands on including a digital camera firmly installed with it.

Hurray!

But what is this all about? Last year during my last field mapping in the Erzgebirge with my previous university we discovered some pieces of "black shales" or bituminous clay slate, highly deformed but undescribed, actually unknown to even the local geologist. They somehow got stuck in my mind and now there was the chance to take a closer look at them. I had some clues there might be acritarchs inside. Maybe from the Carboniferous, maybe from the Ordovician or Cambrian. There indeed are a lot of organic leftovers, however, it soon became clear actually finding something that still resembles what it used to would require a lot of patience.

I uploaded the two images that turned out best. I used a normal polarisation microscope from Leica. Images were taken at a magnification of 63x. As you may see the thin sections aren't the best but that is the best you get if you don't want to pay.

I encircled what remotely resembles an acritarch (or perhaps chitinozoa). Their size might fit. The flask-shaped sacs resemble my literature. Carboniferous would be a bit on the edge but possible and the age of the black shales is still undetermined. Here is another one.

Using a normal thin section and microscope for searching these kinds of microfossils isn't exactly standard procedure. However, if you have no funds and nothing better to do it does seem to work. That is if I am not halucinating and seeing shapes that don't exist. As you can imagine I will be digging the literature even more now to find sources about palaezoic acritarchs and chitinozoa.

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

A Thin Section, Geotripper and WoGE

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I added A Thin Section to my Geoblogs. To be able to host Where on (Google) Earth images of his own JMA created it and is also reviewing the previous searches there. Go take a look! He is also hosting WoGE #94 these days.

Also I came across Geotripper these days. A geology teacher who is hosting very interesting pictured of the day and opinions.

Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth # 93

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Sagan solved Where on (Google) Earth #92. He does not have his own Blog thus he allowed me to chose an image in his place. I spend some time pondering about it because I have a feeling it may be very hard. If there are no right answers till wednesday or thursday I will give a hint or two. For any new players to Where on (Google)Earth, simply put the lat-long or detailed description of the location in the comments below. A lot of us will typically say a little something about the geography or geology and sometimes we share our tactics for searching. If you win, you get to host the next one.
The Schott Rule (previous winners must wait for 1 hour for every win) is in effect.

Post time was 05:11 PM Central European Time. CET is GMT+1.

Sunday, January 13, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth # 92

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JMA got my WoGE #91 about the Kaiserstuhl right very fast. He doesn't have a Blog of his own to post the new image so he supplied me with the location. Naturally I myself won't participate because I know the location. So...JMA will have to decide when the image has been correctly identified.




For any new players to Where on (Google)Earth, simply put the lat-long or detailed description of the location in the comments below. A lot of us will typically say a little something about the geography or geology and sometimes we share our tactics for searching. If you win, you get to host the next one.

The Schott Rule (previous winners must wait for 1 hour for every win) is in effect.

Post time was 10:18 PM Central European Time or GMT+1

Saturday, January 12, 2008

Where on (Google) Earth? #91

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Today I got the location right at Where on (Google)Earth #90 over at Clastic Detritus the first time. That means it's my turn to post a picture! I am a bit uncertain on the difficulty level but I hope people will find this one interesting.



For any new players to Where on (Google)Earth, simply put the lat-long or detailed description of the location in the comments below. A lot of us will typically say a little something about the geography or geology and sometimes we share our tactics for searching. If you win, you get to host the next one.


The Schott Rule (previous winners must wait for 1 hour for every win) is in effect.

Post time was 10:43 PM Central European Time. That's GMT+1.

Friday, January 11, 2008

Three more Geoblogs

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Today I discovered 3 new Geoblogs. The first is Geolismus.de a German blog about Public Relations and Publicity in Geo- and Mining Sciences. The other Geoblog I discoverd is GeoCosas y mas written in Spanish coming from Peru or Chile. This is very interesting. I used to live in Peru and spent 6 months there travelling and practising within a Peruvian Mining Company. The last is **SlingShot Thought** from GeologyJoe covering also a wide range on non-Geology topics.

Thursday, January 10, 2008

Geoblogs everywhere

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Geoblogs everywhere! I find it astonishing to find so many Geology related Blogs on the internet so fast. I didn't expect that. I added those I personally liked most to my link list of Geoblogs. I bet there are more out there...

Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Minerals from Berlin

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Berlin isn't exactly a place that offers many possibilities in terms of mineral collecting. There is a heavy mineral placer in Berlin at the "Müggelsee" though. The "Müggelsee" is a recreational area in the south-east of Berlin. In the last days of summer a friend and I decided to check it out and confirm if there is any substance to the rumours we had heard. Even gold has been found there!

Here is a view of the "Müggelsee" Bath:

It is located on the north-west side of the lake. From there we took a turn right to the west. We only took a small walk and found a spot with slightly darker sand. Here we put my pan to the test. After some practising we got our first result:

You can clearly see the darker areas containing the mineral magnetite. To test it we used a magnet:


This was the first time we used a pan to look for minerals. We were happy that even unexperienced users like us can get results easily.

We cleaned our sand samples and took them to university some days later. Besides magnetite there are several other heavy minerals that can be found. We also found zircon, garnet, pyrite and titanite although only in very small quantities. Using a binocular we tried making fotos. Unfortunately only those showing a garnet (we think) turned out well. Here it is:
I should have written down the magnification. I will have to ask my friend. We didn't spend any time on finding out why we have a placer there. I assume it is a result of the last glaciation period though human influence is immense and the sand could just as well be from elsewhere. On time and occasion I will try to find some literature about it and make a follow-up post here.
References

English? Deutsch?

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Before I started my blog I spent much time on deciding what language to use. I opted for English to better reach out to people who don't speak German. I know most people in the world don't and a lot of my geo-community friends neither. I received some remarks that made me think about this issue again though. It is a pity that we do not all speak the same language but keeping a bi-lingual blog is not worth the effort (yet).

I will keep experimenting. It might be interesting for non-German speakers to also get a glimps at what a German students does. Perhaps I will get some comments on this.

Meine deutschen Leser haben sich vielleicht gewundert, warum ich englisch schreibe. Es erschien mir schlichtweg einfacher um auch mit anderen Nationalitäten und deren geologischen Kreisen in Kontakt zu treten. Ein zweisprachiges Blog scheint mir überflüssig, auch wenn ich hin und wieder mein Englisch erst noch aufpolieren muss. Was meint ihr dazu?
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Some people who know me might wonder what happened to my website I have had for a few years. Well, I stamped it down and deleted it - though it might stell show online till they update their server. I never updated it so no loss to anyone! I hope this Blog I started will be more fun. No one seemed to like the site anyways.

Monday, January 7, 2008

Mississippi...

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Did I mention yet I like these very much? Mississippi Valley Type Deposits? I never have seen one for real but I noticed I read any kind of article I get my hands on lately. There were some nice articles in Mineralium Deposita in the last year about the Kicking Horse and Monarch deposits in B.C. and some deposit in Iran whose name I cannot spell.

I have a nice Zebra Ore specimen from San Vicente/Peru on my shelf. Maybe I make it my "pet-rock". Too bad I don't have the time and money to follow-up the invitation I have to go and visit them. It's kinda far away from Germany so maybe I should try to find some closer to home...

Is anyone out there into mineral deposits and exploration, too?

Never ending story...

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For ages two friends and me have been busy with this stupid mapping work for university. We finally managed to get a preliminary report done when our supervisors had the bright notion of coming up with some new and interesting ideas!!! Hello??? It's winter up there now in the Ore Mountains and snow and ice cover everything. You can't do heavy mineral sampling in streams there now! They should be leaving their ivory tower a few times more often...

Anyways. Here is what our map will look like. Nice colors, no? Reddish are Rhyolits, lilac Phyllits and yellowish Gneiss. The funny symbols designate smaller occurences too tiny to be shown in scale on a map.

Here's a nice september view of the beautiful landscape close to the german-czech border 800 m above sealevel.

Field work a year ago was nice with good weather though. Four days could wrap it all up. Too bad labs need months to tell us the geochemistry will have to be canceled for costs reasons. Ahh...well, we hope to get the final version handed out end of January. That will be one happy day!

The Lost Geologist

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WOW! My first Blog! What a challange to write something smart when there is nothing to write, yet. Maybe there is. Why "The Lost Geologist"? Frankly, that's how I feel very often. Not because I don't know anything but because that's what it feels like when standing out in the open and seeing a huge mountain towering in front of you under an even bigger sky. I think many would feel a bit small...and lost.

I study Geology in Germany. In a little year I hope to be finished with my Master Degree. Maybe I will reveal more about me later. No rush now.

Now I'll be busy figuring out this blogging thing...