Thursday, May 28, 2009

One step closer

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Finally! Yesterday I finally wrapped-up my maps and mailed them to my supervisor! I'm a big step closer to completing my diploma mapping project. Yes, writing the report remains but a big worry is off my head now and I have my mind free now to write something good. The maps were driving me insane recently and I am so glad they are finally gone. Time to take a few days off and then return with full strength for a month of report writing and interpretating. A few days off will also benefit my blogging now that I have less to worry about.

Saturday, May 23, 2009

What the Lost Geologist is busy with...

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My university is a wonderful place. Really is! We have all kinds of wonderful stuff - except the really useful one. Instead of finding a way to let students use Corel or other specialised software to do important things they found a better way - let the student figure it out by himself (I won't even start with all the other things that don't work - I'm in a good mood still!). That's why I am currently developing a tennis elbow while playing around with various free graphic softwares to design a good, vertical profile of my mapping area.


Screenshot of what I do

I'm busy for two days now with what you can see above. By now I believe I am too perfectionist and should just have scribbled something on a piece of with some pencils. *sigh*

When I am done with it, then it'll deserve a place in an art gallery!

Thursday, May 21, 2009

What happened to the Accretionary Wedge?

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Did it already fall to the fate of complete subduction? The site lists #17 for March but I haven't seen nor heard anything about it ever since. Was there one for April? What about May? Or am I just becoming blind and didn't notice? Maybe I'm not the most active contributer but I loved ready each edition.

What happened?

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

More about RSS feeds for geoscience journals

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Brian from the Clastic Detritus blog wrote about RSS feeds for geoscience journals. I'm glad I could help out with a few more feed adresses. I figured I might just as well share my article feed that I compiled recently of all the journals that I browse for something interesting. Below is a list of the 28 journals I have on my feed. Not all journals seem to have RSS feeds. Those I check manually, i.e. Economic Geology. Blogger doesn't allow me to include the article feed in a blog post so I will add it to my side-bar. You need to scroll down a bit. (I need to do some side-bar cleaning I believe)

P.S.: I forgot to also list the individual RSS feeds. Will update that later today (or tomorrow).
  • Chemical Geology
  • Earth-Science Reviews
  • Earth and Planetary Science Letters
  • Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
  • Journal of African Earth Sciences
  • Journal of Geochemical Exploration
  • Journal of Geodynamics
  • Journal of South American Earth Sciences
  • Journal of Structural Geology
  • Lithos
  • Marine Geology
  • Marine and Petroleum Geology
  • Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
  • Sedimentary Geology
  • Tectonophysics
  • Ore Geology Reviews
  • Journal of Petroleum Geology
  • Basin Research
  • Sedimentology
  • International Journal of Earth Sciences
  • Mineralium Deposita
  • Facies
  • Journal of Geosciences
  • Geofluids
  • Palaeontology
  • Lethaia
  • Terra Nova
  • Resource Geology

Saturday, May 16, 2009

Cool samples from fieldwork #03

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Another great find from my work is an extraordinary large calcite crystal that I managed to recover from one location. Outcrops are really worth checking out in the really unaccessible parts. This one required some climbing and I do have to admit that I did not have the courage to return to the location a second time. I suppose this one formed either by diagenetic processes or karstification in general. Didn't get around, yet, to review my notes on this location. It is a really cool find though! From the same location I also managed to recover a few very tiny fluorite crystals within a boxwork of calcite blades. Perhaps I managed to make fotos of those, too.


Large calcite crystals

By the way: Please excuse the lack of substantial blogging. The diploma mapping report and maps are keeping me occupied more than I want them to.

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Cool samples from fieldwork #02

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Here is the biggest belemnite I ever found! Dispite the fact that both ends are missing this is an interesting find especially because of its large size of about 15 cm! I will need some expert advise to correctly identify this one - can't know everything. Poor palaeontology prof will imagine he didn't teach me anything...


Jurassic (Bajocian) belemnite from SW-Germany

Sunday, May 10, 2009

Cool samples from fieldwork #01

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During fieldwork I came across a number of really cool fossil and rock samples. For my report I need a couple of good images to illustrate my finds and conclusions. So I had a small foto session today and made some fotos. One of my coolest finds is a plate covered with a lot of crinoid stems and arm fragments that I identified as Isocrinus nicoleti. Since my palaeontology is not so good I will get another opinion from one of the experts at my university though. Anyways, enjoy some nice fotos!


Plate with crinoid stems


Close-up of large stem and arm fragments


Close-up and cross-view of stem fragment. Note the typical star-like appearance.

Thursday, May 7, 2009

Should I...?

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...or should I not? Perhaps you remember some early post of mine about a seminar paper discussion chitinozoan finds in phyllites of the Erzgebirge. At the end of september this year there will be a conference - GeoDresden2009 - of the DGG (German Geological Association) in Dresden. Beautiful town by the way! The theme of my seminar paper would fit perfectly to the regional theme of the conference in my opinion though I am a litte...actually very nervous about attending and having a poster. I never did that before and I don't know if my little "investigation" is thorough enough and of sufficient quality. There are only 5 thin-sections and only one of them has a handful of microfossils in them. Being burried in work for my diploma mapping and hopefully in 1 month in my thesis I won't have time to go back to the samples and make new sections. So I basicly need to use what's in my seminar paper unless I get a hold of some old papers I've been looking for for months. Deadline for submission is May 31st.

Any advice?

Friday, May 1, 2009

Geoblog: Carbonate Sedimentology

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I didn't realise it until now but there is a new geoblog out there. Neuwendao is blogging from China about his research interest in carbonate sedimentology, its sedimentation and diagenesis as he describes it. The Carbonate Sedimentology blog was born April 18th and I am keen on seeing more from this new geoblogger who apparently shares a common interest of mine with carbonates.